Women’s Health

Breast Care

Watch the video

Comprehensive, compassionate breast care that values your emotional health.

We understand that when it comes to dealing with a potential new breast cancer diagnosis less is more. Less waiting time, less worry time. Our Breast Navigator, understands this and our team functions quickly and efficiently to get patients in; seen; and, if necessary, biopsied. The results are delivered and explained as soon as possible. The unknown is scary we get that.

We work to improve the outcome of breast cancer treatment and surgery by:

  Involving our patients in shared decision making about their best option for treatment. 
 Staying up to date on the latest recommendations from national experts and organizations to best serve our cancer patients.
  Always offering and involving plastic reconstructive surgeons, when possible, for the best cosmetic outcome.
Why us?

Choose the right provider and care team for your breast cancer treatment.

Choosing the right provider may be the most critical decision you make as a breast cancer patient. At St. Joseph’s Health, our care providers strive to make that decision an easy choice during a difficult time. The surgeons at St. Joseph’s Health see and treat more breast cancer patients than any hospital in the area There’s a reason for that.

Early Screenings

Our focus on early detection.

It has been repeatedly shown that breast cancer screening saves lives and that some women require even closer surveillance due to their personal risk factors. That is why our team of providers assesses each woman’s individual risk, and tailor their screening accordingly.

NAVIGATOR

Our Breast Care Navigator: There with you. There for you.

Our Certified Breast Care Navigator is exclusively trained in the treatment and management of breast cancer. They understand not only the complexity of the disease but also the emotional toll it can take on the patient. They are there from the beginning, throughout the many treatments, which they arrange, and for any questions or concerns.

GENETIC TESTING

Our genetic counseling and testing.

We have dedicated nurse practitioners who specialize in cancer risk assessment and in genetic counseling and testing. These specialists will help determine whether or not a patient’s case warrants genetic testing or counseling. They’ll also support individuals who are found to carry a genetic abnormality by explaining appropriate screening options for at-risk cancers as well as patient management options.

Self-screenings

Understanding your self-breast exam.

Although most of us are familiar with the idea of ‘finding a lump’, breast cancer symptoms don’t present the same way for every individual. Familiarize yourself with what feels ‘normal’ on your own body, and if you notice any changes, alert your doctor. Regular self-breast exams are essential but are not a substitute for regular screening mammograms. Annual screening mammograms may detect an abnormality before it is felt.

Alert your doctor if you notice:

 A lump or mass in the breast
 A lump or mass in the armpit
 Breast skin changes: skin redness, thickening of the breast skin, ulcerations or nonhealing wounds
 Dimpling or puckering on the breast
 Discharge from the nipple
 Nipple changes, including the nipple turning inward, or scaliness on the nipple
Although symptoms do not always mean that you have breast cancer, it’s essential that you talk about such symptoms with your doctor because they may be a sign of other health problems.
RISK FACTORS

Understanding and managing your risk factors.

Breast cancer risk factors:

Age:

75% of breast cancers are diagnosed in women over age 50.

Family history:

A first-degree relative who developed breast cancer increases your risk of developing the disease, particularly if that relative was diagnosed before age 50 and if the cancer was in both breasts.

Personal history:

Once you have been diagnosed with breast cancer you have a slightly greater chance of developing it again.

Race:

Caucasian women are at a slightly higher risk than African American women.

Childbirth:

Women who had their first child after age 30 or who never had any children are at a slightly elevated risk.

Previous radiation therapy:

Women who have been exposed to large amounts of radiation as part of treatment for diseases such as scoliosis, Hodgkin’s disease, lymphoma and tuberculosis are at greater risk for developing breast cancer before age 30. Small amounts of radiation do not increase risk of cancer.

Hormone Replacement Therapy:

Long-term hormone replacement therapy (5 or more years) after menopause can increase risk. The decision to use hormone replacement therapy should be made by a woman and her doctor only after evaluating the risks and benefits.

Breast lesions:

Certain proliferating cells have been associated with increased cancer risk. These include atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobule hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ.

Weight:

Post-menopausal women who are obese have a 20%–40% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women with normal weight.

Drinking alcohol:

Drinking more than one drink per day increases your risk of cancer.

Genetics:

Five to ten percent of breast cancers are associated with a hereditary gene. The most common genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2. The risk for a woman carrying one of the BRCA gene mutations is as high as 85 percent. Many people with a family history of breast cancer consider genetic counseling and testing for these mutations.

Menstrual Periods:

If you started mensturating before the age of 12 or reached menopause after the age of 55, you are at a slightly higher risk for breast cancer.

Get in touch with our breast care team.

Women’s care

Breast Care & Surgery

4117 Medical Center Drive
Fayetteville, NY 13066
315.744.1551
Directions >

Your safety continues to be our top priority.

We are taking extra steps, exceeding standards and continuing to find new and innovative ways to keep you safe. Quality and safety are cornerstones of our care.

Learn more
Watch the video

Comprehensive, compassionate breast care that values your emotional health.

We understand that when it comes to dealing with a potential new breast cancer diagnosis less is more. Less waiting time, less worry time. Our breast navigator, understands this and our team functions quickly and efficiently to get patients in; seen; and, if necessary, biopsied. The results are results delivered and explained as soon as possible. The unknown is scary we get that.

We work to improve the outcome of breast cancer treatment and surgery by:

  Involving our patients in shared decision making about their best option for treatment. 
 Staying up to date on the latest recommendations from national experts and organizations to best serve our cancer patients.
  Always offering and involving plastic reconstructive surgeons, when possible, for the best cosmetic outcome.
Why us?

Choose the right provider and care team for your breast cancer treatment.

Choosing the right provider may be the most critical decision you make as a breast cancer patient. At St. Joseph’s Health, our care providers strive to make that decision an easy choice during a difficult time. The surgeons at St. Joseph’s Health see and treat more breast cancer patients than any hospital in the area There’s a reason for that.

Early Screenings

Our focus on early detection.

It has been repeatedly shown that breast cancer screening saves lives and that some women require even closer surveillance due to their personal risk factors. That is why our team of providers assesses each woman’s individual risk, and tailor their screening accordingly.

EARLY SCREENINGS

Our focus on early detection.

It has been repeatedly shown that breast cancer screening saves lives and that some women require even closer surveillance due to their personal risk factors. That is why our team of providers assesses each woman’s individual risk, and tailor their screening accordingly.

NAVIGATOR

Our Breast Care Navigator: There with you. There for you.

Our Certified Breast Care Navigator is exclusively trained in the treatment and management of breast cancer. They understand not only the complexity of the disease but also the emotional toll it can take on the patient. They are there from the beginning, throughout the many treatments, which they arrange, and for any questions or concerns.

GENETIC TESTING

Our genetic counseling and testing.

We have dedicated nurse practitioners who specialize in cancer risk assessment and in genetic counseling and testing. These specialists will help determine whether or not a patient’s case warrants genetic testing or counseling. They’ll also support individuals who are found to carry a genetic abnormality by explaining appropriate screening options for at-risk cancers as well as patient management options.

Self-screenings

Understanding your self-breast exam

Although most of us are familiar with the idea of ‘finding a lump’, breast cancer symptoms don’t present the same way for every individual. Familiarize yourself with what feels ‘normal’ on your own body, and if you notice any changes, alert your doctor. Regular self-breast exams are essential but are not a substitute for regular screening mammograms. Annual screening mammograms may detect an abnormality before it is felt.

Alert your doctor if you notice:

 A lump or mass in the breast
 A lump or mass in the armpit
 Breast skin changes: skin redness, thickening of the breast skin, ulcerations or nonhealing wounds
 Dimpling or puckering on the breast
 Discharge from the nipple
 Nipple changes, including the nipple turning inward, or scaliness on the nipple
Although symptoms do not always mean that you have breast cancer, it’s essential that you talk about symptoms with your doctor because they may be a sign of other health problems.
RISK FACTORS

Understanding and managing your risk factors.

Breast cancer risk factors:

Age:

75% of breast cancers are diagnosed in women over age 50.

Family history:

A first-degree relative who developed breast cancer increases your risk of developing the disease, particularly if that relative was diagnosed before age 50 and if the cancer was in both breasts.

Personal history:

Once you have been diagnosed with breast cancer you have a slightly greater chance of developing it again.

Race:

Caucasian women are at a slightly higher risk than African American women.

Childbirth:

Women who had their first child after age 30 or who never had any children are at a slightly elevated risk.

Previous radiation therapy:

Women who have been exposed to large amounts of radiation as part of treatment for diseases such as scoliosis, Hodgkin’s disease, lymphoma and tuberculosis are at greater risk for developing breast cancer before age 30. Small amounts of radiation do not increase risk of cancer.

Hormone Replacement Therapy:

Long-term hormone replacement therapy (5 or more years) after menopause can increase risk. The decision to use hormone replacement therapy should be made by a woman and her doctor only after evaluating the risks and benefits.

Breast lesions:

Certain proliferating cells have been associated with increased cancer risk. These include atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobule hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ.

Weight:

Post-menopausal women who are obese have a 20%–40% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women with normal weight.

Drinking alcohol:

Drinking more than one drink per day increases your risk of cancer.

Genetics:

Five to ten percent of breast cancers are associated with a hereditary gene. The most common genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2. The risk for a woman carrying one of the BRCA gene mutations is as high as 85 percent. Many people with a family history of breast cancer consider genetic counseling and testing for these mutations.

Menstrual Periods:

If you started mensturating before the age of 12 or reached menopause after the age of 55, you are at a slightly higher risk for breast cancer.

Get in touch with our breast care team.

Breast Care & Surgery

4117 Medical Center Drive
Fayetteville, NY 13066

315.744.1551

Directions >

Your safety continues to be our top priority.

We are taking extra steps, exceeding standards and continuing to find new and innovative ways to keep you safe. Quality and safety are cornerstones of our care.

Learn more

We’re here to offer guidance and expertise at all stages of your well-being.

Request an appointment